Why Not Just White?

Why use so many colors to paint a white chair? In order to create a finish that looks like ones you see on antiques and vintage furniture, you must create a depth and texture that is extremely hard to accomplish with one color of paint. If you look closely at the chair above you will see several colors that contribute to a white washed, bleached looking finish. It looks like it has been hand painted many times and over the years and through use and age the paint has been worn off in various areas. Its lack of uniformity and imperfectfections give it character. Combining various shades and tints in layers allows you to create a vintage looking finish.
a
Sometimes painting white can be more complicated than a bold color. To see more ideas for white click on my posts, Country Sideboard,  At Your Service  and  Swedish Country Style.
a

6 Comments

Ana

I love the mix of colors in this chair. I would like to attempt the same on an apron and legs of a table I’m working on. Did you layer the colors in the order listed? I’m so glad I found your blog, you have an amazing talent and eye for color

Reply
Leslie Stocker

Hi Ana,
Generally if I want the end result to be a light finish, I will start with the dark colors and layer the lighter ones on top of them.By the end of the process I will be spot painting and dry brushing small areas rather than painting solid layers. Does this make sense? At that point i usually have 2 or 3 of the colors on a paper plate and using 1 brush, go back and forth between the colors to refine areas. It sounds more time consuming than it really is. I rarely sand colors back, but many people do. It’s just a personal preference. I find it easier to keep adding paint, rather than try to take it off, if I make a mistake.Chalk Paint drys so quickly that I can touch up areas while other parts are drying. I have tried color combinations that ended up not working, but I’ve never had to strip the paint off and completely start over. Latex and acrylics are much less forgiving. I hope I answered your question, but let me know if I need to clarify any of this. Thanks for reading my Blog and taking the time to comment,
Leslie

Reply
Leslie Stocker

Hi Jamie,
Dry brushing is a technique where you put very little paint on your brush. I usually put a small amount on a paper plate and barely dip a corner of my brush. Even then its a good idea to keep a paper towel or rag handy so that you it almost looks like there is no paint on your brush. Its easiest to do on corners and edges so you might want to start there.Lightly swipe the bristles so there are uneven thin lines about the size of a pencil marks. It is easy but it does take a little practice. The effect is similar to that of a light wash. It is easy to get too much paint on your surface, but you can wipe it off and try it again. I usually work in small areas at a time. It will look like light feathering. This all sounds so vague as I write this. Im planning on adding some how to videos on techniques here but probably not until July. Shauna of Perfectly Imperfect blog has a good how-to video and there are probably others on YouTube. I hope this helps a little bit. Leslie

Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *