What? Another Paint Chart?

Many people think Annie Sloan Chalk Paint is too expensive, but I actually believe it is a great value.  It is so highly pigmented, that a little goes a long way. Other than artists paints, the ones that come in those 2 ounce tubes, I have never found a paint of this quality.  That said, if you paint furniture on a regular basis and want a wide range of colors, smart buying is the key.  It is important to have a few basic colors. Pure White, Old White, or Graphite added to a blue, red, green, or yellow will give you a wide range of shades. 

Buying the most staurated color of a group, will give you the most flexibility. Its easy to lighten a dark color. Even if you love green, buying all of the greens will limit your ability to create different looks. This chart is meant to organize by color group, and saturation,  to expand your range and maximize your budget.
 
I’d love your feedback on this. Is this something you do?  Or do you find her colors so subtle  it is too hard to mix them. Do you have a few favorite colors you use most of the time?

7 Comments

Mary

Understanding color is both science and art. I am surprised your question hasn’t generated any discussion because your comment on buying the most pigmented color makes sense. What would you recommend for a beginner?

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Leslie Stocker

Mary,
With the exception of white, definitely start with the sample sizes until you know you like the color enough for more than one project. If your goal is purely mixing, Graphite, Pure White, Emperor’s Silk, Napoleonic Blue. English Yellow. In theory you should be able to get every color with the primaries, black, and white. But you will probably be disappointed. You will never be able to get a good green, like Antibes, with Napoleonic Blue and English Yellow. Also English Yellow has a lot of green in it on its own. Emperor’s Silk is a great red and you should be able to make a wide variety of pinks from that and Pure White. And Napoleonic Blue is a good solid between royal and navy that mixes well for a large range of blues.That said, if there is a color you like you should just go ahead and try it. You can waste a lot of paint trying to mix for a particular color. It makes sense not to buy many colors that are very close like Antoinette, Henrietta, Emile, Paloma. or Duck Egg and Provence. French Linen or Coco, both are great but you can make do with either one of them.Chalk Paint has great coverage and goes a long way, but it also expensive. Thats why I think its best to start with the sample sizes and choose carefully. Complicated subject. Hope this helps a bit
Leslie

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Mary

It helps a lot. Thanks. Your comment about not buying similar colors is also helpful and makes sense to me. I bought a quart of old white yesterday. I have a beautiful shabby chic armoire I bought for my daughter about 15 years ago. It appears to have been painted with chalk paint in a creamy white. I would like to paint the interior blue like Annie sloan did for the armoire in her latest book. She used Greek blue. So I know I want a blue.

I also want a warm grey color – so I will have to think about that. I am looking around for upholstery fabric for the chairs then I’ll decide on the grey. Does coco have a pink hue in it?

Since it looks like clear wax darkens the paint a little could I mix in a little old white to the clear wax to keep the color or lighten a color? Have you ever done this?

Reply
Leslie Stocker

Mary,
Yes Coco is warm and Annie says French Linen is a cool color. Although I have substituted one for the other at times.
You can always add a little paint to your clear wax.It’s a great way to make a subtle change in the overall color and also boost your highlights without having to paint and rewax. There are many more techniques I hope to get to eventually.
Leslie

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Becky Backert

Thanks for laying out these colors in a different way than Annie’s color wheel. It makes it easier to see how they fit together, or not. I’m going through all the tutorials for inspiration. Nice work, short, to the point and clear. I have FB friends who want to learn how and I point them to your site. I am hoping you will have classes sometime. I can gather several interested folks.
I ordered the Eze paint containers and a starter pack of the Norwex cloths as you suggested. I’m the one who asked about what color white to paint my house. Little did I know how crazy that question was and how many whites there are! You probably laughed and said, I’m not touching that one. Please forgive my cluelessness.
Can’t wait to try layering on a rose chair I’m working in ASCP in Burgundy. I need another snow day or late in the day cancellations.
Thanks for inspiring we ASCP addicts!
Paint on!
Becky

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Veronique Brunet

I am trying to get some bright turquoise, emerald and blue-green sea water. Which colours shall I mix? I have followed a workshop of Annie Sloan in Hk but the laides could not get me the colours I was looking for. Mixing Provence + Old white did not give a bright color. Thank you to help.

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